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13 June 2013 @ 02:26 pm
Somebody say sourcream? A Hattip  
I love sour cream. Not surprising given the amount of ethnic food I eat and baking I do. Sour cream is just so darn versatile!

I can across this post by the Alchemist with not one but two recipes for making sour cream at home with just a few ingredients.

Way cool-
KC
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anthony_lionanthony_lion on June 14th, 2013 07:02 am (UTC)
Sour cream is GOOD!

Goes great with salmon or fried Mackerel/Herring.
(I get the Mackerel and Herring for 'free'. Just have to go and 'pick it up' with a fishing rod)

Does wonders for any number of casseroles or soups, too.
(A couple of spoonfuls and even the dullest freeze-dried soup turns into a feast for a king. As long as it's not a 'clear' soup... )
Kestrel Catkestrelcat on June 14th, 2013 07:40 am (UTC)
It will fix most anything.

Cheers-
KC
anthony_lionanthony_lion on June 14th, 2013 09:11 am (UTC)
It's also a pretty decent main ingredient...

You should try 'Rømmegrøt' (Sour Cream Porridge' for dinner one day.
http://cooking-books.blogspot.no/2010/02/sour-cream-porridge-or-rmmegrt.html

Make it a bit 'runnier' than the pictures on that site, though.
(About the same consistency as store-bought sour cream in fact)
raisins are good, but by no means critical. And the 'Fenalår' can also be skipped.(The really good stuff is rather expensive)

Another version, mentioned in the comments section:
http://smakebiten.com/2012/05/14/ekte-rommegrot-laget-med-speltmel/

Translation and comments:
2 'cups' of sour cream ('Seterrømme' is just one of many variants, this is the fattest I think. it comes in 3dL plastic cups, so in total 6dL)
3 dl finely ground 'spelt' flour.
5 - 6 dL Whole milk (3.xx% fat)
a bit of salt.

Heat the sour cream to a boil and leave it boiling for a couple of minutes. Feel free to use a lid on the pot...
Add half the flour and stir vigorously as it thickens. Repeat a few times until it starts cooking again.

Now the butter begins emerging. If it doesn't happen, stir in some ice-cold water to 'crack' the porridge. Leave the porridge to boil on low heat and scoop up the butter as it separates. Keep doing it until it stops.

Mix in the rest of the flour. Now the mass will start collecting as a lump. Mix in milk little by little to avoid clumping. As the porridge thins, you can add more milk at the time. Let the porrigde reach a boil now and then as you do so.
Add salt to taste.

Served with the skimmed off butter, sugar cinnamon and 'flatbread'.

The rest is a comment on what type of pot to use. The author of the article has had bad experiences with iron pots, and prefers cheap IKEA types.

Here's a link to Flatbread recipes.
http://www.fromnorway.net/norwegian_food/200004/flatbreadarticle.htm
The stuff also goes great with lots of soups and casseroles, and can be stored for a long, long time.
Kestrel Catkestrelcat on June 15th, 2013 06:20 am (UTC)
That sound awesome!

I will try that.

KC